Friday, June 22, 2018

PERSIAN! June 22, 1768 at the Colden Store, Coldengham, New York

Wednesday, June 22, 1768
Coldengham, New York
Store of Cadwallader Colden, Jr.

Persian

Alexander Wilson purchased one-eighth yard of Persian Silk (Pershen) at the Colden Store on this day, 250 years-ago. Silk was sometimes used to make neck handkerchiefs and perhaps that is what Wilson planned to do with this very narrow strip of fabric.

Gold Persian Silk Reproduction.  Image Courtesy of wmboothdraper.com

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This article is one in a series of a daily accountings of Colden Store transactions. Be sure you read the first installment for an introduction to the store. You should also read this article which appeared in the Journal of the Orange County Historical Society.

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The 1882 Dictionary of needlework [p. 389] describes Persian as 'An inferior description of silk stuff, thin, and designed for linings of women's cloaks, hoods, and articles of infants' dress. It is soft, fine, almost transparent, and not durable.' It seems strange to me that the price of a lining would be so high (12-19 Shillings/yard) for a fabric that is not even seen?

Persian was a very popular item at the Colden store (48 transactions), but it was purchased in small quantities -- 90% were one-half yard or less. Perhaps it was used for scarves or bonnet linings where little fabric was needed?

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Thursday, June 21, 2018

CALICO! June 21, 1768 at the Colden Store, Coldengham, New York

Tuesday, June 21, 1768
Coldengham, New York
Store of Cadwallader Colden, Jr.

Calico

Hans Yurry Haas purchased one and one-half yards of Calico at the Colden store on this day, 250 years-ago. Calico was a cotton fabric imported from India, which was often adorned with floral patterns. It was used for women's gowns and jackets, but could also be used in handkerchiefs, drapes, or quilts.

Floral Stripe Calico Reproduction.  Image courtesy of wmboothdraper.com

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This article is one in a series of a daily accountings of Colden Store transactions. Be sure you read the first installment for an introduction to the store. You should also read this article which appeared in the Journal of the Orange County Historical Society.

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Calico was a popular fabric in the Colden Store.  He sold almost 200 yards in 90 transactions over the course of the DayBook. Calico was reasonably priced at five to seven shillings per yard (for example Osnaburg sold at 2 Shillings/yd and Lawn at 11 Shillings/yd).

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Wednesday, June 20, 2018

FERRETING! June 20, 1768 at the Colden Store, Coldengham, New York

Monday, June 20, 1768
Coldengham, New York
Store of Cadwallader Colden, Jr.

Ferreting

John Gillespy purchased one and one-half yards of fereting (ferreting) from the Colden Store on this day, 205 years-ago. Ferret was a close cousin of 'tape' and 'binding.' One of Webster's three definitions for 'ferret' in 1828 included 'A kind of narrow woolen tape.' Caulfield defined it as 'a kind of tape, narrower than ordinary bindings, and made of silk, cotton, or worsted.' [Caulfeild, 1882 Dictionary of Needlework p. 204]

7/8' Dark Indigo Blue Worsted Tape (synonymous with ferreting?) Image courtesy of wmboothdraper.com

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Search the DayBook

This article is one in a series of a daily accountings of Colden Store transactions. Be sure you read the first installment for an introduction to the store. You should also read this article which appeared in the Journal of the Orange County Historical Society.

===============================

Colden sold ferreting on sixteen different occasions at the store, totalling about thirty yards. It must have been more elegant than normal binding and tape as it normally sold for six pence per yard compared with three pence for binding and one or two pence per yard for tape. In one instance, it was described as 'White Fancy Ferreting' which sold at a whopping two and one-half shillings per yard. That was more expensive per yard than Osnaburg fabric.

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Monday, June 18, 2018

GOLDSMITH! June 18, 1768 at the Colden Store, Coldengham, New York

Saturday, June 18, 1768
Coldengham, New York
Store of Cadwallader Colden, Jr.

Abigail Booth Goldsmith

Abigail Booth Goldsmith, 75 years-of-age, purchased tea, indigo, a plate, a fine comb, and a linen handkerchief at the Colden Store on this day, 250 years-ago. She would live another 25 years, just a few months shy of the century mark.

Headstone of Abigail Booth Goldsmith (1693-1793). Image courtesy of Shirley Goldsmith.


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This article is one in a series of a daily accountings of Colden Store transactions. Be sure you read the first installment for an introduction to the store. You should also read this article which appeared in the Journal of the Orange County Historical Society.

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The surname 'Goldsmith' appeared thirty times in the DayBook. Abigail Goldsmith appeared to be a widow as she had her own account and her grandson is mentioned on her account (as is her son and James Crawford). Her account had transactions on seven occasions.  Today's purchase was the last time she was mentioned in the DayBook.

Thomas Goldsmith was mentioned twenty-one times in the DayBook. His son (name not revealed) appeared at the store several times to take delivery of his father's purchases. John Miller also took delivery for Thomas as did Jacob Lawrance who was described as a tenant on Goldsmith's land. On one occasion a 'Mr. Goldsmith' took delivery of items purchased by Dr. Hill.

In summary, the DayBook gives us some clues to this family even though it is not a genealogical record. Here is a working hypothesis: Abigail was the widowed mother of Thomas (and perhaps a daughter married to James Crawford). Thomas had a son born before 1755 and land in Wallkill Precinct.

In the 1779 tax assessment of Hanover (created in 1772 from Wallkill Precinct where the store was) Thomas Goldsmith had a large 640-acre farm and £200 of personal property. Judging from its position on the assessment, the property was close to the Goodwill Church, just south of the property owned by Joel Campbell's (this blog's eponym) father.  By 1790 the farm had been sold to others as no Goldsmith appears in the 1790 census for Montgomery, Ulster County, New York (as this area was known at the time).

Much of the genealogy on ancestry.com is questionable, but it appears the husband of Abigail died in 1743 leaving her with a large estate including 1000 acres along the Paltz River (Wallkill River) that he called Homefield. This may have been the same property mentioned in the 1779 tax assessment.  His will.  Is it possible that Thomas, her son, was a Loyalist and left the area during the Revolutionary War?

Abigail's headstone stands in the Tuthill Family Cemetery in Hamptonburgh, Orange County, New York, still within 15 miles of the Colden estate where the Store was located.

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Sunday, June 17, 2018

BINDING! June 17, 1768 at the Colden Store, Coldengham, New York

Friday, June 17, 1768
Coldengham, New York
Store of Cadwallader Colden, Jr.

Binding

Samuel Clark purchased two and one-half yards of 'Binding' at two pence per yard at the Colden Store on this day, 250 years-ago. Binding was used to secure cloth edges in sewn garments.

Bias Tape (Binding). Image courtesy of madeeveryday.com

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Search the DayBook

This article is one in a series of a daily accountings of Colden Store transactions. Be sure you read the first installment for an introduction to the store. You should also read this article which appeared in the Journal of the Orange County Historical Society.

===============================

Colden sold hundreds of yards of binding at his store. Binding sold for only two to three pence per yard and was rarely described as 'worsted.'

Binding was always sold along with other sewing supplies. Webster defined it in his 1828 dictionary as "something that secures the edge of cloth." Caulfeild confirms this in her 1887 Dictionary of Needlework stating that the term binding "denotes the encasing of the edge of any material...in the folded band of tape, braid, ribbon, or of any other stuff cut on the bias..."

The last definition indicates that the term might have been used interchangeably with ribbon and tape which were items frequently sold at Colden's store. Perhaps the term 'binding' was unique to material cut on the bias (diagonal to warp and weft) and folded.

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Saturday, June 16, 2018

TESTAMENTS! June 16, 1768 at the Colden Store, Coldengham, New York

Thursday, June 16, 1768
Coldengham, New York
Store of Cadwallader Colden, Jr.

Testaments

Mattys Felter purchased two 'Testaments' at the Colden Store on this day 250-years ago. Just five days prior he had purchased an additional two Testaments.

Colden also sold 'Bibles' at about twice the cost of a 'Testament' indicating that the latter probably contained only what is referred to today as the New Testament chapters.

Harwood's New Testament, 1768.


In 1768, Edward Harwood published his translation of the New Testament which became quite popular. You can view Harwood's New Testament as a free e-book here.  It would be a coincidence if this was the version of the New Testament purchased by Felter, but it confirms that single testaments were sold at this time.

About twenty Bibles or Testaments were sold over the sixteen months covered by the DayBook.

Why Felter needed four copies of a Testament remains a mystery. Was he purchasing them as a church official? Were they gifts for family members? Was he using them to educate his children in reading and writing? Felter's motives remain unanswered, but we know that for some reason the two testaments purchased five days prior were not adequate and two more were purchased on this day.

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This article is one in a series of a daily accountings of Colden Store transactions. Be sure you read the first installment for an introduction to the store. You should also read this article which appeared in the Journal of the Orange County Historical Society.

===============================

Search the DayBook

Friday, June 15, 2018

TAPE! June 15, 1768 at the Colden Store, Coldengham, New York

Wednesday, June 15, 1768
Coldengham, New York
Store of Cadwallader Colden, Jr.

Tape

James Daily purchased one piece of tape at the Colden Store on this day, 250 years-ago. 'Tape' as it is used in the DayBook is believed to be as described by Webster in his dictionary of 1828: "A narrow piece of woven work, used for strings and the like; as curtains tied with tape."

Tape Loom.  Image courtesy of readingeagle.com


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Search the DayBook

This article is one in a series of a daily accountings of Colden Store transactions. Be sure you read the first installment for an introduction to the store. You should also read this article which appeared in the Journal of the Orange County Historical Society.

===============================

Caulfeild describes tape in her 1887 Dictionary of Needlework as "narrow bands of linen or cotton, employed as strings...employed by tailors to bind buttonholes and selvedges." The low cost of the Colden Store tape (1-2 pence per yard) suggests that the tapes may not have been as decorative as the image above, but a more practical item in sewing as described by Caulfeild.

Tape was sold on more than sixty occasions at the store. Sometimes it was sold by the piece (about 25 times) at over a shilling per piece. At other times (about 25) it was sold by the yard at one or two pence per yard. On rare occasions it was described as worsted, crepe, cap, or stay tape.

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