Monday, December 17, 2018

Update on 1793 Campbell Farm on Route 208

Since my last blog on this subject new information has come to light regarding the location of the Campbell farm in Montgomery, New York. That farm is the subject of the 1793 deed from the Campbell siblings to Thomas Barkley. The work of Jay Campbell, Bob Goodwin - Campbell Genealogist, and Mary Ellen Matise - Village of Walden Historian have have led to these new conclusions.

In short, the Campbell farm was located slightly farther south on Route 208 than previously proposed. Its location was most likely right on top of the current major intersection of 17K and 208. At that date, Route 17K did not exist. The ancestral Milliken lands (on which Captain Peter Milliken's historic home still stands...see prior blog) sat to the north of these lands on Coleman Road.

Outline of Campbell Farm described in 1793 Deed in Montgomery, Orange, NY.

Background

The location of the Campbell farm described in a 1793 deed to Thomas Barkley was previously identified as stradling Route 208 at its intersection with Coleman Rd. The deed gives a detailed survey of the property including the identification of neighbors. A sale of property from Barkley to Bowne in 1826 (Liber FF397) seemed to match up with the half of this property on the West of 208.

Recently that location has been called into question. The property north of Coleman Rd contains the home of Captain Peter Milliken of the war of 1812, who was the son of Captain James Milliken who was killed at the Revolutionary Battle of Fort Montgomery. He was the son of Alexander Milliken who is mentioned in the 1793 Campbell deed as being on their northern border.  Had I misplaced the northern border of the Campbell farm?

My prior analysis involved plotting the shape of the farm from the survey data in the deed, then positioning it on the 1862 farm map based on survey points that fell on Route 208 and farm lines on the 1862 map and on current satellite images. The survey was rotated to match the 'north' on the 1862 map and stretched to match road curvatures and geographical features (stone walls/edges of fields/1862 borders). I was particularly struck by the notch in the northwest corner of the 1862 Peter Eager property which seemed to match the notch in the 1793 deed (called "Winan's corner"). In addition, the curvature in Route 208 where the 'old road' still exists seemed to match the curvature in the southern part of the Campbell/Barkley farm of 1793. Those features led to my location of the farm as shown in the prior blog.

Reanalysis

The major factors in repositioning the location of the farm were 1) identification of the 1719 Kennedy Patent in which the Campbell farm was located and 2) the placement of the 1793 survey on a Global Information Systems map rather than the inaccurate 1862 map allowing better matching of Route 208 curvatures with those in the 1793 survey.

The Kennedy Patent is an almost triangular 2000-acre parcel granted to Archibald Kennedy in 1719. The 1719 grants are historical and appear in many documents and maps.

1719 Patents shown on map of 1829. Archibald Kennedy Patent of 2000 acres shown with blue dashed lines.

In 1740, Benjamin Haynes Sr. acquired a parcel in the Kennedy patent that stretched from its northern to southern boundaries. He deeded that property to his son, David, in 1743 (Ulster Liber FF154 [113]). The deed gives a survey not only of the property in question, but also of the 2000-acre Kennedy patent in which both the Campbell farm and the Haynes farm were located. The deed goes on to describe the location of the farm of Haynes's son, Benjamin Jr., which is further west, but also in the Kennedy patent and sharing its northern boundary with Kennedy boundary.

The farm of Benjamin Haynes (Haines) Jr. eventually came into the hands of Thomas Wait who is shown on the 1862 farm map. A survey of this land is contained in the deed of Nathan Haines (grandson) to James Kerr in 1826 (Liber CC195 [133]) The description of that sale has Johnston Young to the east, Peter Milliken to the north, Samuel J. Scott to the east, and the Newburgh Turnpike (17K) on the south.  The interesting part about this sale was that Nathan needed to make a payment to James and John Barkley (sons of Thomas Barkley to whom the Campbells had sold their farm) and their wives.  In the small world of Montgomery, the Barkley brothers had married the Haines sisters, Ann and Martha.

The surveys of the Haines' farms with respect to 17K (north/south positioning) and correlation with the 1862 map (east/west positioning) give us a good indication of the boundaries of the Kennedy patent. Combined with current existing parcel boundaries on the Orange County GIS map, the location of the Kennedy patent was determined.

Parcels in Kennedy Patent plotted on Orange County GIS map. See description below. See High Resolution Version of map here.

The red dashed lines are the survey of the Kennedy Patent directly from the Haynes deed of 1743. The blue dashed lines are the Kennedy patent based on the survey shape (red line), surveys from the Haines' deeds, and visible parcel boundaries on the current GIS map.

Note that the Kennedy Patent border is south of Coleman Road. The Campbell farm was in the Kennedy Patent, so the Campbell farm did not include land where the Peter Milliken home stands (as previously proposed).  Indeed, this supports the statements that the ancestral Milliken lands were on Route 208 in the James Alexander Patent which borders the Kennedy Patent to the north.  This location is stated as early as 1735 in the Records of the Road Commissioners of Ulster County. But did the Millikens also own land to the south of that in the Kennedy Patent? If they did, it would force the location of the Campbell farm even further south on Route 208.

Generally the historic 1719 patent lines were reflected in later parcel boundaries. However, in the 1862 map, Peter Eager (inheritor of Milliken lands) has land that juts below the Alexander/Kennedy Patent line near Route 208. It is now believed that this small chunk in the Kennedy patent was also ancestral Milliken lands. First, the 1793 Campbell survey fits nicely with that chunk as its northern border (see zoomed image) and Milliken land was known to border on its north. Secondly, it makes the Campbell farm coincide nicely with the 1862 farm of Robert Young. Exactly how Young acquired the land from Thomas Barkley is not known, however Robert Young's father, Johnston Young, was married to a daughter of Thomas Barkley, so it may have come as some sort of inheritance. Thirdly, the survey of the Campbells did not mention the colocation of any of its borders with those of the Kennedy Patent. This location agrees with this.

Parcels in Kennedy Patent. The 2000-acre patent is outlined in blue dashed lines. Coleman Road is the road north of the top patent line. Benjamin Haynes' 1743 survey is the green polygon. The Wait/Haines farm is the orange polygon. The Campbell/Barkley/Young farm is the dark blue polygon.

One interesting note is that the Newburgh-Cochecton Turnpike (17K) had not been built in 1793 (the road running east-west through the parcels above). The main east-west road, known as the Wallkill Road, coincided roughly with the current Bracken Road to the south (bottom of the above map). When the new road was built in 1800, the historic Campbell farm was further split. Today it is a busy intersection. This location is much more developed than the one previously thought to be the site of the farm.

Well...that is how research goes. Sometimes you get it wrong.

Full write-up on 1793 Campbell-Barkley Deed (written in 2012)

Saturday, December 1, 2018

December 1, 1768 near Coldengham, New York

Thursday, December 1, 1768 [250 years-ago from today]
Coldengham, New York
Store of Cadwallader Colden, Jr.

The Freeholders of New York write their Assemblymen

The New-York Journal of this date contained a letter on page one (dated November 24th) from the freeholders and freemen of New York City to their Assembly leaders. They complained about the law that required them to provide lodging for the troops in the city, arguing that the law was made without their input...it was taxation without representation.

They also commented on the request from Britain that the New York Assembly NOT answer the 'Boston Letter' (the one that sought the alliance of other colonies in protesting the 'Intolerable Acts'). Such a request was 'the most daring insult that ever was offer'd to any free legislative body.'

The colonists near Coldengham were undoubtedly aware of the rising tensions in Boston and New York City. But here at this remote outpost there were no troops needing quartering and the new tariffs only affected merchants like Colden at this point.

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This article is one in a series of a daily accountings of Colden Store transactions. Index to Colden Store Blogs. Be sure you read the first installment for an introduction to the store. You should also read this article which appeared in the Journal of the Orange County Historical Society.

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At the Colden Store on this date, the residents were getting ready for the winter months. One year prior, on December 1, 1767, Colden had sold many yards of Shalloon, Buckram, Osnaburg, Mohair, and Wilton fabrics, thread and six dozen buttons.  He also sold shoe heels and leather. Salt was sold by the bushel for preserving meats. Colden bought three hogs on behalf of the store, probably with the intention of making barreled pork and reselling it. The store sales on December 1, 1768 are not preserved, but they were likely similar to the prior year.

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Thursday, November 29, 2018

Demolition of 'Old Milliken Homestead' on Campbell Farm near the Wallkill

[Author's note: An Update that corrects errors stated below was posted on December 17, 2018]

An historic home on the Wallkill farm of Samuel Campbell (sold in 1793) is slated for demolition.

Noted historian, Mildred Parker Seese, included the "Old Milliken Homestead" in her book of Old Orange Homes.


Undated Photo from Seese, Old Orange Houses Volume I, 1941, p10. Note diamond-shaped window in attic.

This is the home that still stands on the northeast corner of Route 208 and Coleman Road in Montgomery, New York. It is in disrepair and unoccupied. The property was once part of the Samuel Campbell farm (1773-1793) and is currently part of the Bruderhof Community. It is slated for demolition.

Picture taken by the author in March 2015. Looking from the west.  Note diamond-shaped window matching the house in the Seese photo.

Photo taken by the author in May 2014. Already in advanced state of decay.

Photo taken by the author in May 2014. Front entry.

In a prior blog, I described the ownership history of this property.  It was originally part of a large 2000 acre patent granted to Archibald Kennedy in 1719. The Campbell-Barkley deed states that the part of the Kennedy patent that eventually came into Campbell hands, was 'granted' to Thomas Goldsmith (a 'Thomas Goldsmith' appeared twenty-one times in the Colden Store DayBook of 1767-8) who in turn 'granted' it to David Baldwin (could this be the same 'David Baldwin' of Newark Mountain where Samuel Campbell was living prior to coming to New York?). Samuel Campbell purchased it from Baldwin, probably in the late 1760s.

The location and boundaries of this property can be pinpointed thanks to the detailed description in the deed and the still existing stone walls that bordered the early farms.

Property Lines (red) of Campbell Farm in 1793 deed. The 'Milliken' home is just to the north of the 'Coleman Rd' label.

Barkley already owned property to the east of this parcel.  In 1826 his son sold a parcel of land to Susan Bowne which included the part of the Campbell parcel west of Route 208.

Barkley sale to Bowne in 1826. 1793 boundaries of Campbell farm in green.The boundaries are plotted on the 1862 farm map of Montgomery, NY.

By 1862 the eastern part of the Campbell farm was part of the Peter Eager estate. He is still listed as the owner in the 1875 Atlas. The 1903 Atlas refers to the home and property as "Maple Lawn" owned by Chas. Coleman.

Milliken property appears to the west of the Bowne property on the 1862 farm map of Montgomery. The 1793 deed also described Milliken property abutting the Campbell farm on the north (above the Peter Eager parcel shown above.) However, I have found no reference other than Seese that the Millikens owned the property on which the 'Milliken' home stands.  Could she be mistaken? Is this really the Peter Eager house built onto or near the original Campbell homestead?

Stay tuned.

Wednesday, November 28, 2018

November 28, 1768 near Coldengham, New York

Monday, November 28, 1768 [250 years-ago from today]
Coldengham, New York
Store of Cadwallader Colden, Jr.

Governor Moore offers reward!

Controversy still abounded two weeks after activists burned the Royal Governor of Massachusetts in effigy near the Merchant's Coffee House in New York City.

Merchant's Coffee House on right. Courtesy of New-York Historical Society

Page three of the New-York Weekly Mercury displayed a Proclamation from Henry Moore, Royal Governor of New-York. He offered a fifty pound reward for the identification of the 'rioters' who burned effigies of the the governor of Massachusetts Governor and the Sheriff of Boston.  The rioters' crime was not plainly stated but they created 'noise and tumult' and 'disturbed the public tranquility.' They had gathered on the northeast end of Queen Street (current Pearl Street) and proceeded 'hastily' as far as the Merchant's Coffee House (at Queen St. and Wall St., now Pearl and Wall).

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This article is one in a series of a daily accountings of Colden Store transactions. Index to Colden Store Blogs. Be sure you read the first installment for an introduction to the store. You should also read this article which appeared in the Journal of the Orange County Historical Society.

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At the Colden Store on this date, the residents were likely buying up cloth to make winter garments. One year prior, on November 28, 1767, Colden had sold five yards of 'Cloth', a yard of Cambric, two yards of Linen, a yard of Buckram, five yards of Shalloon, and four sticks of Mohair, over six dozen Buttons, and about ten skeins of Thread. [Search for "1767-11-28" at http://www.orangecountyhistoricalsociety.org/Colden_DayBook_Items_Large.html]

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Saturday, November 24, 2018

November 24, 1768 near Coldengham, New York

Thursday, November 24, 1768 [250 years-ago from today]
Coldengham, New York
Store of Cadwallader Colden, Jr.

A Year-ago at the Store; More troops at Boston; More on the Effigy Incident

On this day in 1767, one year prior to today's date, fifty-six items were sold at the Colden store. Despite the late date, flaxseed was still being brought to the store and purchased by Colden for five shillings per bushel. Perhaps today was like that November-day one year-ago when Colden purchased the flaxseed as well as butter, beeswax and venison?

The New York City newspaper of today contained news from Boston of the 13th of November.  More British troops had arrived in Commodore Hood's Men of War. The 64th and 65th regiments had arrived a few days earlier from Cork, Ireland. The reporter wrote that 'The parade of the Guards on weekdays [was] grander than in time of war...'

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This article is one in a series of a daily accountings of Colden Store transactions. Index to Colden Store Blogs. Be sure you read the first installment for an introduction to the store. You should also read this article which appeared in the Journal of the Orange County Historical Society.

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Page three of the New-York Journal continued the press coverage of the effigy incident of the 14th. The paper's printer, John Holt, defended his publication's account of the effigy burning after being accused of deceiving the public as to the level of public sympathy for the perpetrators. His defense was that '...nobody supposes that printers are to be vouchers for the truth of intelligence they publish...' The issue was not dead. In the coming Monday's edition of the Weekly Mercury, the Governor will offer a reward for identification of the effigy burners.

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Wednesday, November 21, 2018

November 21, 1768 near Coldengham, New York

Monday, November 21, 1768 [250 years-ago from today]
Coldengham, New York
Store of Cadwallader Colden, Jr.

More on Protests in New York City and Six Nations Treaty

On Monday, November 14, 1768, effigies of the royal Governor of Massachusetts (Bernard) and Boston Sheriff (Greenleaf) were burned in the streets of Manhattan to protest the enforcement of the recent punitive tariffs in Boston.  See prior blog.

The burning of effigies had been a British pastime for ages, but it may have come more naturally at this particular time of year because of an annual tradition since 1605, sometimes known as Guy Fawkes Day. That day fell on November 5th. Protestants celebrated the day by burning an effigy of the Pope. Perhaps a few activists had left-over effigy-making materials and turned their energies towards current events?

The narrative that appeared in today's Mercury and Post Boy newspapers was the royal version. It did not mention the names of those burned in effigy or the nature of the protest, but spent most of its text describing military efforts to inhibit the protests and the general disapproval by the majority of New Yorkers.

The author of this version, town clerk, Augustus Van Cortlandt, wrote a forward in which he stated that Holt's version in the New-York Journal 'deceived' his readers by stating that the protest was 'generally approved' by the populace.

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This article is one in a series of a daily accountings of Colden Store transactions. Index to Colden Store Blogs. Be sure you read the first installment for an introduction to the store. You should also read this article which appeared in the Journal of the Orange County Historical Society.

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The newspapers of this date also contained more information about the boundary line agreed with the Six Nations in the Fort Stanwix Treaty of November 5th. It passed far to the west of the Delaware River, but the location where Joel Campbell (eponym of this blog) would settle in 1805 near current Ridgebury, Pennsylvania, was still in Indian Hunting Grounds.

Treaty of Fort Stanwix Boundary Line, Wikipedia Commons. Locations where Joel Campbell resided shown in red by author.
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Saturday, November 17, 2018

November 17, 1768 near Coldengham, New York

Thursday, November 17, 1768 [250 years-ago from today]
Coldengham, New York
Store of Cadwallader Colden, Jr.

Protests in New York City and Six Nations Treaty

Three days ago, on Monday evening, November 14, 1768, activists in New York City burned effigies of the royal Governor of Massachusetts and the Sheriff of Boston. Despite the authority's efforts to stop it, the mob met on Queens Street (current Pearl Street in Manhattan). The protest was reported on page three of the New-York Journal of November 17th.

As described in a prior blog, the British had recently landed thousands of troops in Boston to quell the unrest related to the latest round of punitive tariffs. New York City was the base of Britain's North American forces. It was an appropriate place to protest alleged British mistreatment of its colonies.

Holt's New-York Journal was the most patriotic of the three New-York City papers and covered the story by publishing an account written by a Boston sympathizer.  It read:

Article on protest in New York City on Monday, November 14, 1768. New-York Journal, November 17, 1768, p3 genealogybank.com

The competing newspapers of Parker and Gaines would issue a different version of the event in their editions of November 21st.  It was written by the  town clerk, Augustus V. Cortlandt. Unlike the prior account, it stated that the protest was 'disapproved by the majority of the citizens.' See future blog.


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Search the DayBook

This article is one in a series of a daily accountings of Colden Store transactions. Index to Colden Store Blogs. Be sure you read the first installment for an introduction to the store. You should also read this article which appeared in the Journal of the Orange County Historical Society.

===============================

More momentous news was brought from the North. This may have been old news in the taverns near Coldengham as the bearers of the news had descended the Hudson River and had undoubtedly stopped at New Windsor.

Sir William Johnson and leaders from several colonies had successfully negotiated with the Six Nations at Fort Stanwix. 3200 Indians from almost 20 tribes were present. A new Boundary Line was agreed on "between their Hunting Country and this and the other Colonies to the Southward."

For the residents of Coldengham this meant less fear of Indian interference as they migrated west towards the Delaware River. This area already had a settlement called Peenpack near the current city of Port Jervis, New York. Peenpack had a history of Indian raids. The area between the Wallkill and the Delaware rivers was often referred as the 'frontiers' and would be defended, mostly unsuccessfully, by Coldengham area militias over the next fifteen years. By 1790, Joel Campbell, eponym of this blog, and most of his children would be living in the area of Peenpack (See references to the farm on the Neversink River at the end of this article.)

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